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What Happens to a Helium Balloon Released into the Air?

0 votes

February 20th, 2013 06:24
in Physics by loveu (University of California (CA) - UCLA, Brand management)

What Happens to a Helium Balloon Released into the Air?

"A kid lets go of a helium balloon and watches it rise slowly up to the sky. Does it: 

a) rise until the air pressure is low and the temp. is cold enough for the helium to compress and the balloon sinks, then when it falls back to regular air pressure and temp. it rises again and it continues in a loop (up and down) until ultimately it falls to the ground when it runs out of helium?

b) rise higher and higher until it floats/explodes in space?

c) explodes from the low air pressure, then the torn rubber/plastic falls slowly to the ground?

d) Other?

I've wondered about this since I was a kid..."

6 Answers
0 votes

March 5th, 2013 07:19
doggy (University of London, Criminal law)
"a) no, the compression due to cooling is way offset by expansion due to lowering pressure b) no, it never reaches outer space. c) correct, except it explodes due to the lower air pressure. This causes the balloon to expand until it reaches it's expansion limit and breaks. This is why balloons intended to reach high altitudes start out with the envelope only partially filled. edit: ""I never saw a piece of balloon fall from the sky,"" neither did I, but there is a lot of land and ocean for it to fall into."

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0 votes

May 15th, 2013 08:48
dharamnishth (Aliah University, Programming)
"They gain altitude till they explode... the sun might do it, or many other factors. as for littering, well, after it explodes the rubber fall back to earth and it will litter the place it landed on, its a good point there... and i doubt there is a law enforcing it or seeing this action as littering, even when it does"

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0 votes

May 16th, 2013 09:19
atmaja (Shoolini University of Biotechnology and Management Sciences, Biomedical)
They eventually lose their gas and drop out of the sky. As 2/3 of the planet is water, many of them land in the water where marine animals mistake them for jelly fish (they don't know what mylar is.) The may eat them and are unable to pass them.

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May 21th, 2013 13:24
pampaaaa (Bengal Engineering & Science University, Computer sciences)
    Eventually they will pop or deflate, and fall either on land or into the ocean. In the ocean, sea creatures like dolphins, porpoises, and seals will try to eat it and choke to death. If you see one, pick it up and save a life. I do think it would be littering, since its not organic material that would be turned into compost. I know some people think its fun, and your kid was young and oblivious, but please, educate her and don't do it. Thank you for asking, because sea creatures are suffering from our trash when they shouldn't.

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0 votes

May 28th, 2013 08:47
honda-civic (Acharya Nagarjuna University, Digital electronics)
    "Cracker question because helium balloons are actually a pretty controversial topic. Some people argue that they are harmful to the environment because on returning to Earth, animals mistake them for food, eat them, and die. Now for this to happen, the balloons would have to come back down in fairly large chunks. These chunks would then have to either block the animal's airways and choke them, or become lodged in their digestive system causing a fatal illness. Neither of these outcomes sounds very nice for animals so it's worth investigating more.           "

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May 31th, 2013 14:09
lakhan (Acharya Nagarjuna University, physcis)
    First of all, we'd better look at how balloons are released. When helium filled balloons are handed out at public events, they usually come with a piece of string or ribbon attached. The attachment is either tied into the knot, or secured with a plastic disk. Either way, if these balloons are accidentally (or purposely) released, the attachment becomes litter and that's bad. I've only spotted a few balloons in the amazing amount of litter I see surfing here in Sydney, but they all had ribbons attached. So rule number one, don't let go of your balloons!

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